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Yanni Fan
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Hello,

I'm back from vacation and catching up on the latest buzz on the YMB.

I was going to post this article before I left but ran out of time. This is an article from The Oregonian printed in the Friday entertaiment section on May 16, 2003.

YANNI'S DEMONS
By Ed Condran

Comedian Chris Rock once cracked that if 10 million people bought the Spice Girls album, why didn't he know anyone who had purchased a copy?
The same line could apply to Yanni. He's sold more than 20 million albums, but it's unusual to hear anyone discussing the finer points of a Yanni disc.

Q: To paraphrase the apt question on the back of your book, what are the chances that a poor kid from the seaside town of Kalamata, who doesn't sing, dance, study, write or read music, becomes one of the worlds's most popular musicians?

A: (Yanni) It's impossible. But I love impossibility. I love when I talk to kids nowadays and tell them, "If I'm able to do what I did, you can do anything." About the only thing I give credit to me is my ability to take pain and my ability to focus.

Q: You took an extensive break after your '98 tour.
A: (Yanni) It was for my mental health. It was for my own good. I really burned out on the '98 tour. The stress got to such a high level.

Q: What did you do during your five-year hiatus?
A: (Yanni) The first thing I did was run away. (Laughs) I went back to Greece, to the place where I was born (Kalamata). I walked away from my career. I did no interviews, nothing. I didn't play piano for one year. I walked the mountains with my dad. I dealt with the pain. I just sat there and said, "I'm not going to leave unless I feel happy again."

Q: Was there a strong possibility that your career was over?
A: (Yanni) Yes. It was a very strong possiblity. I had very serious talks with my father in the mountains. He said, "If you don't write another song as long as you live, you'll be fine." There is a lot of Greek in me. Greeks like to enjoy life. My grandma, who is gone now, I would talk to her and she would say, "Yanni, how are you doing?" I'm in China playing the Forbidden City and she would say, "Yeah, yeah, but how are you DOING? Are you loving life?" Sometimes I would say "No, I'm not. My career is doing great, but I am not happy."

Q: The average person will read this and think, Yanni has it all. What's he whinning about?
A: (Yanni) Of course. That's the irony of it. The irony is called trouble in paradise. You get to paradise and you're not happy. That's more scary than if you're not in paradis and not happy because you hope someday it will get better. What's better than paradise? How can you not be happy?

Q: How depressed were you?
A: (Yanni) Seriously. It was very painful. I dealt with it.

Q: What was the big impediment?
A: (Yanni) It was a lot of things. It was a brainwashing that took place over a peroid of years.

Q: Did the brainwashing have anything to do with Ramtha, which you and Linda Evans reportedly checked out?
A: (Yanni) No. I don't follow anyone. I listen to a lot of things. I study a lot of religions. But I follow nothing. I believe in life. You follow you own path and teach yourself. I've done that my whole life. The brainwashing is a word my dad uses. I was burnt out and I still had about 80 more concerts to do. I was brainwashing myself to make it through it. I was going nonstop for eight years. When the tour finally did end I couldn't figure out which way was up. It was like hanging onto a helicopter blade and it stopped. Now what do I do? I had an extremely successful tour. I didn't know how to enjoy it.

Q: Unlike your peers, you didn't lock yourself up in a bedroom all day practicing scales as a teenager. You were an outdoorsman. You were the Greek 50-meter swimming champ at 14. You were a jock.
A: (Yanni) Being an athlete is in my blood. If you study ancient Greece, you will discover that many philosophers were athletes. A healthy mind and a healthy body is something I took to heart. My father said if you want to be an artist, read books, but it doesn't mean you can't have a good body. Thanks to all of my athletic competition I could endure. I could work 15-20 hours straight in the studio with no food. I'm built well. I can take the pain, which I did swimming from 8 to 18.

Q: There are a number of entries from Linda Evans in the book. Are you two still close?
A: (Yanni) Absolutely. She helped me put this tour together. We're very close. I learned a lot from her. She was a wonderful lover and a teacher. She's an incredible human being.

Q: Is there a chance for a romantic reunion?
A: (Yanni) You can never say never, but I would say probably not.

-END-
 
Registered:: March 31, 2003Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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This is awesome!
Thanks for sharing.
 
Registered:: May 01, 2003Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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You're welcome! I thought the Q & A was good.
Yanni was candid and honest as always.
 
Registered:: March 31, 2003Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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Very enlightening interview.
Yanni is very honest, most importantly, with Himself.
Thank You for sharing. good reading.
 
Registered:: December 17, 2002Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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Glad you enjoyed reading it Chris.

I hope more will jump in and read it as well.
 
Registered:: March 31, 2003Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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They should Rudyrara,
It's really good reading.

------------------
THROUGH YANNI, KINDRED SPIRITS.
 
Registered:: December 17, 2002Report This Post
Yanni Fan
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by rudyrara:
Hello,

I'm back from vacation and catching up on the latest buzz on the YMB.

I was going to post this article before I left but ran out of time. This is an article from The Oregonian printed in the Friday entertaiment section on May 16, 2003.

YANNI'S DEMONS
By Ed Condran

Comedian Chris Rock once cracked that if 10 million people bought the Spice Girls album, why didn't he know anyone who had purchased a copy?
The same line could apply to Yanni. He's sold more than 20 million albums, but it's unusual to hear anyone discussing the finer points of a Yanni disc.

Q: To paraphrase the apt question on the back of your book, what are the chances that a poor kid from the seaside town of Kalamata, who doesn't sing, dance, study, write or read music, becomes one of the worlds's most popular musicians?

A: (Yanni) It's impossible. But I love impossibility. I love when I talk to kids nowadays and tell them, "If I'm able to do what I did, you can do anything." About the only thing I give credit to me is my ability to take pain and my ability to focus.

Q: You took an extensive break after your '98 tour.
A: (Yanni) It was for my mental health. It was for my own good. I really burned out on the '98 tour. The stress got to such a high level.

Q: What did you do during your five-year hiatus?
A: (Yanni) The first thing I did was run away. (Laughs) I went back to Greece, to the place where I was born (Kalamata). I walked away from my career. I did no interviews, nothing. I didn't play piano for one year. I walked the mountains with my dad. I dealt with the pain. I just sat there and said, "I'm not going to leave unless I feel happy again."

Q: Was there a strong possibility that your career was over?
A: (Yanni) Yes. It was a very strong possiblity. I had very serious talks with my father in the mountains. He said, "If you don't write another song as long as you live, you'll be fine." There is a lot of Greek in me. Greeks like to enjoy life. My grandma, who is gone now, I would talk to her and she would say, "Yanni, how are you doing?" I'm in China playing the Forbidden City and she would say, "Yeah, yeah, but how are you DOING? Are you loving life?" Sometimes I would say "No, I'm not. My career is doing great, but I am not happy."

Q: The average person will read this and think, Yanni has it all. What's he whinning about?
A: (Yanni) Of course. That's the irony of it. The irony is called trouble in paradise. You get to paradise and you're not happy. That's more scary than if you're not in paradis and not happy because you hope someday it will get better. What's better than paradise? How can you not be happy?

Q: How depressed were you?
A: (Yanni) Seriously. It was very painful. I dealt with it.

Q: What was the big impediment?
A: (Yanni) It was a lot of things. It was a brainwashing that took place over a peroid of years.

Q: Did the brainwashing have anything to do with Ramtha, which you and Linda Evans reportedly checked out?
A: (Yanni) No. I don't follow anyone. I listen to a lot of things. I study a lot of religions. But I follow nothing. I believe in life. You follow you own path and teach yourself. I've done that my whole life. The brainwashing is a word my dad uses. I was burnt out and I still had about 80 more concerts to do. I was brainwashing myself to make it through it. I was going nonstop for eight years. When the tour finally did end I couldn't figure out which way was up. It was like hanging onto a helicopter blade and it stopped. Now what do I do? I had an extremely successful tour. I didn't know how to enjoy it.

Q: Unlike your peers, you didn't lock yourself up in a bedroom all day practicing scales as a teenager. You were an outdoorsman. You were the Greek 50-meter swimming champ at 14. You were a jock.
A: (Yanni) Being an athlete is in my blood. If you study ancient Greece, you will discover that many philosophers were athletes. A healthy mind and a healthy body is something I took to heart. My father said if you want to be an artist, read books, but it doesn't mean you can't have a good body. Thanks to all of my athletic competition I could endure. I could work 15-20 hours straight in the studio with no food. I'm built well. I can take the pain, which I did swimming from 8 to 18.

Q: There are a number of entries from Linda Evans in the book. Are you two still close?
A: (Yanni) Absolutely. She helped me put this tour together. We're very close. I learned a lot from her. She was a wonderful lover and a teacher. She's an incredible human being.

Q: Is there a chance for a romantic reunion?
A: (Yanni) You can never say never, but I would say probably not.

-END-




Thank you so much for sharing this.. Yanni is such a wonderful human being, always so honest and inspiring.... I would love to get a copy of this article. Do you know how I can? Alli

------------------
alli
 
Registered:: May 21, 2003Report This Post
<LisaMPereira>
posted
Thanks for sharing this article with us.
-Lisa
 
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Yanni Fan
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Kathy,

Sure thing! I'll email you.
 
Registered:: March 31, 2003Report This Post
Yanni Fan
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Alli,

Just checking to see if you want a copy of the newspaper article . . . let me know.
I sent copies out to 3 other people.

Anyone else?
 
Registered:: March 31, 2003Report This Post
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